Reginald Nocom Joins StratEdge as Process Engineer for Manufacturing Semiconductor Packages and IC Assembly Services


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StratEdge Corporation, leader in the design, production, and assembly of high-frequency and high-power semiconductor packages for microwave, millimeter-wave, and high-speed digital devices, announces that Reginald (Regi) Nocom has joined StratEdge as a process engineer. With over 20 years in the microelectronics industry and extensive experience in implementing Six Sigma practices, Nocom is well-positioned to lead StratEdge in the development of new processes for manufacturing semiconductor packages and enhancing StratEdge's IC package assembly services.

"StratEdge moved into new facilities last year for designing and manufacturing high-speed, high-power, DC to 63+ GHz packages, and includes cleanrooms for IC package assembly services," said Tim Going, president and CEO of StratEdge. "With the growth of our Assembly Services Division, we are excited to bring Regi on board to help further improve our manufacturing processes."

Nocom comes to StratEdge from Samtec, where he served as a research and development process engineer. He is certified in Six Sigma Green Belt training, has 5S and RETC semiconductor training, and has developed numerous manufacturing tools and processes.

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