KYOCERA to Acquire Japan-Based Showa Optronics Co., Ltd.


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Kyocera Corporation today announced that it entered into a share transfer agreement with NEC Corporation on March 25, 2020 to acquire all of NEC’s shares in Showa Optronics Co., Ltd., an optical components manufacturer. After the share transfer is completed, Kyocera will own 93.53% of SOC’s shares; SOC will begin operating as a subsidiary of Kyocera on June 1, 2020, under the name Kyocera Showa Optronics Co., Ltd. (KSO).

Background Information and Objectives

With its highly advanced manufacturing technologies, Kyocera's optical components business has engaged in producing diversified lenses in small to large diameters from a wide variety of materials. The products have been used in various fields, including automotive, office and factory automation equipment, and medical equipment, since Kyocera entered this business in 1983.

In 2016, Kyocera expanded this business by acquiring Japan-based Melles Griot KK, a manufacturer of large-diameter and high-precision lenses for factory automation equipment. The company is expanding its production capabilities to meet rising demand.

SOC, established in 1954, has targeted high-value-added markets including space-related products, semiconductor manufacturing equipment (such as exposure equipment), and medical equipment for DNA analysis, using its core technologies of ultra-high-precision lens polishing, high-proof and low-loss film formation, and lasers with outstanding stability.

In acquiring SOC as a subsidiary, Kyocera aims to become a leading optical components company by expanding its new product offerings in the laser market, maximizing synergies through both companies’ combined technologies, and utilizing Kyocera’s worldwide sales network and production facilities to further expand its optical components businesses.

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