Next Generation Jammer Low Band (NGJ-LB) Begins Final DET Tests


Reading time ( words)

The U.S. Navy recently began the final Demonstration of Existing Technologies (DET) test period for the Next Generation Jammer Low Band (NGJ-LB) capability at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland.

Tests are being conducted at the Air Combat Environmental Test and Evaluation Facility and the Facility for Antenna and RCS Measurement (FARM) through this summer. The 20-month DET contract has been a collaborative effort with industry partners to assess technical maturity.

“This is an exciting time for the team,” said Airborne Electronic Attack Systems (PMA-234) Program Manager Capt. Michael Orr, who oversees the NGJ-LB program. “It’s the culmination of almost two years in the making. I’m very proud, despite the current CoVID-19 environment, that our collective government and industry teams continue to focus on delivering fleet capability while also maintaining health and safety protocol.”

Two DET contracts were awarded in October 2018 to Northrop Grumman Corporation and L3Harris, and since then, both companies completed eight significant test events, said NGJ-LB Deputy Program Manager Leon Smith.

NGJ-LB is part of a larger NGJ weapon system that will augment, and ultimately replace the legacy ALQ-99 Tactical Jamming System (TJS) currently used for Airborne Electronic Attack on the EA-18G Growler aircraft.

“NGJ-LB is the next step in the evolution of Airborne Electronic Attack that is needed to meet current and emerging electronic warfare gaps, and our team is dedicated to delivering this capability to the fleet as quickly as possible,” Orr said.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

The Heterogeneous Integration Roadmap for Aerospace and Defense

11/24/2020 | Jeff Demmin, Keysight Technologies
Most people in the semiconductor industry are familiar with the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), which provided guidance for the industry starting in 1991 (as the National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors). As the benefits of Moore’s Law became more difficult and more expensive to achieve, the organization decided to publish a final version in 2016. The baton was handed to the Heterogeneous Integration Roadmap (HIR), with the realization that heterogeneous integration—assembling different types of devices rather than monolithic fabrication—is an important enabler for continued progress in the semiconductor industry.

iNEMI 2019 Roadmap Webinar Review: Aerospace and Defence Products

08/25/2020 | Pete Starkey, I-Connect007
The iNEMI Roadmap is recognised as a valuable tool for defining the state-of-the-art in the electronics industry, identifying emerging and disruptive technologies, and setting industry R&D priorities over the next 10 years. Pete Starkey provides an overview of iNEMI's latest in a series of webinars highlighting the roadmap’s assessments of evolving product requirements, manufacturing infrastructure issues, and technological needs and gaps.



Copyright © 2020 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.