Machine Vision: MVTec Releases New HALCON Software This Fall


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MVTec Software GmbH, a leading international provider of machine vision software, will release the new version 20.11 of its standard software HALCON on November 20, 2020. The release comes with many new and improved features that help users further enhance their machine vision performance. These include optimized technologies for code reading, OCR, 3D, deep learning, as well as a face lift of the integrated development environment HDevelop for even better usability.

What's special about this version is that HALCON 20.11 will be released simultaneously for both the Steady and Progress editions. As a result, HALCON Steady customers can now access the many new features available in the last three Progress releases, including anomaly detection, the generic box finder, and optimized identification technologies. "The full range of new Progress features is now also available to our Steady customers. With HALCON 20.11, we thus offer a comprehensive range of functions for both models – subscription and regular purchase – so that companies can make their machine vision processes even more efficient and professional," remarks Mario Bohnacker, Technical Product Manager HALCON at MVTec.

Interested parties can already try out these previously released HALCON Progress functions by downloading the latest Progress version 20.05 and requesting an evaluation license. They will thus be well prepared for the new version, which will be available in November.

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