AMD EPYC Processors Deployed with Over 2 Petaflops of Computing Power


Reading time ( words)

AMD and Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) , announced the deployment of AMD EPYC™ 7702 processors for use in a new, high performance computing system. The EPYC processor-based supercomputer will deliver the 2.36 petaflops of computing power OIST plans to use for scientific research at the University.

The Scientific Computing & Data Analysis Section (SCDA) of OIST plans to implement the new supercomputer for supporting OIST computationally intensive research ranging from bioinformatics, computational neuroscience, and physics. SCDA adopted AMD EPYC after significant growth, including a 2X increase in users.

“2020 is a milestone year for OIST with new research units expanding the number of research areas. This growth is driving a significant increase in our computational needs,” said Eddy Taillefer, Ph.D., Section Leader, Scientific Computing & Data Analysis Section. “Under the common resource model for which the computing system is shared by all OIST users we needed a significant increase in core-count capacity to both absorb these demands and cope with the significant growth of OIST. The latest AMD EPYC processor was the only technology that could match this core-count need in a cost-performance effective way.”

Key factors of OIST’s selection of the AMD EPYC processors included superior cost-performance, memory/PCIe® bandwidth, and high core counts per server. OIST plans to also consider EPYC processors for other growing computational needs for University researchers in the future.

“AMD is proud to be working with leading global institutions to bring scientific research to the forefront through the power of high performance computing technology,” said Ram Peddibhotla, corporate vice president, EPYC product management, AMD. “With high performance capabilities, ease of management and scalability, 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processors can assist OIST researchers with advancing technological innovations and supporting their research goals in bioinformatics, computational neuroscience, and physics.”

Share

Print


Suggested Items

My View from CES 2021: Day 1

01/12/2021 | Dan Feinberg, Technology Editor, I-Connect007
What a difference a year makes. One year ago, those of us who cover and attend CES were going from one press conference to the next; this year, we are at home going from link to link. Confusing and challenging, yes, but there are some advantages: no masks, only five steps to get to a restroom, being able to have three of four events or more displaying on your screens at the same time and being able to download press kits as needed. So far, many new devices are being introduced, but of course, they are all online, so you wonder if some of them really exist or are truly operational as yet.

CES 2021: Just How Different Will It Be?

01/11/2021 | Dan Feinberg, I-Connect007
CES 2021 starts today and this year there is no need for an overpriced hotel room in Vegas, no long lines to get a taxi or board a bus, and no crowded exhibit halls (one good thing this year). On the other hand, you must decide ahead of time what you want to see and make a reservation or appointment if you wish to have time and access assured.

CES 2020: The Intelligence of Things

01/06/2020 | Nolan Johnson, I-Connect007
Show week for CES 2020 starts well ahead of the actual exhibition dates because it is huge. The organizers of CES state that there are more than 4,400 exhibiting companies and nearly three million net square feet of exhibit space. On the floor, you can find 307 of the 2018 Fortune Global 500 companies. Over the week, I-Connect007 Editors Dan Feinberg and Nolan Johnson will bring you some of the most interesting news, products, and announcements from 5G to IoT, semiconductor developments, autonomous vehicle technology, interconnect, fabrication materials, and much more.



Copyright © 2021 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.