Designing Electric and Magnetic Order for Low-energy Computing


Reading time ( words)

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have developed a new material that combines both electrical and magnetic order at room temperature, using a design approach which may enable the development of low-energy computer memory technologies.

Researchers from the University’s School of Physical Sciences achieved this scientific advance by designed control of the distribution of the atoms within the solid state.

This new material has implications for information storage and processing applications.

Information can be stored in computers in two distinct ways – one relies on the order of atomic-scale magnets in a solid material, the other of atomic-scale electrical charges.

Both storing and manipulating this information costs energy, and with the rapid growth of the internet and internet-enabled devices, there is a strong need for lower-energy approaches to this.

In the first case, writing the information is energy-intensive whilst in the latter it is reading that is energy-intensive.

Liverpool Materials Chemist, Professor Matthew Rosseinsky, said: “Materials with both electrical and magnetic order at room temperature have been hard to engineer because these two properties often have competing requirements.

“We report a new design approach that promises to allow the synthesis and tuning of families of these materials, which are important in the development of low-energy computer memory technologies.”

To make a single material that has these two distinct properties – magnetisation and electrical polarisation – is difficult because the electronic requirements for obtaining them in a material are typically contradictory: materials characteristics, such as the crystal structure or the atomic composition, which favour polarisation often disfavour magnetisation. The new design approach overcomes these difficulties.

The research, published in Nature, was funded by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, and involved collaboration with Trinity College Dublin.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Kirigami Inspires New Method for Wearable Sensors

10/22/2019 | University of Illinois
As wearable sensors become more prevalent, the need for a material resistant to damage from the stress and strains of the human body’s natural movement becomes ever more crucial. To that end, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a method of adopting kirigami architectures to help materials become more strain tolerant and more adaptable to movement.

Worldwide Semiconductor Equipment Billings at $13.3 Billion in 2Q19; Down 20%

09/12/2019 | SEMI
Worldwide semiconductor manufacturing equipment billings reached $13.3 billion in the second quarter of 2019, down 20% from the same quarter of 2018 and 3% from than the previous quarter.

Designing Chips for Real Time Machine Learning

04/01/2019 | DARPA
DARPA’s Real Time Machine Learning (RTML) program seeks to reduce the design costs associated with developing ASICs tailored for emerging ML applications by developing a means of automatically generating novel chip designs based on ML frameworks.



Copyright © 2020 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.